MONDAY MAY 7  THE NEW YORK JAZZ WORKSHOP BEBOP/POST BOP COMBO BLOG MARK SHERMAN

I was the drummer for combo yesterday, but of course it does not hold the combo back as I love to play, and can control any situation from that vantage point. Having grown up studying with Elvin and playing a lot I can really give the combo the feel it needs, and spread the depth of the rhythmic structure of the music itself. Much of my concept on piano and vibes has arrived as a result of my rhythmic concept, which I got, from playing the drums.

We had Vinnie on bass, a newcomer who played very well, and our other normal diligent players. Dave, Rob, and Matt. We ran through Birdlike (Freddie Hubbard), Black Nile (Wayne Shorter), Beatrice (Sam Rivers), After You’ve Gone, and we attempted to play T Monk’s Pannonica. A difficult set of changes to master. After we played Black Nile the second tune we played, I stopped the band and began to talk about anticipation, and the technique of thinking ahead of the changes, and actually playing ahead in order to command the direction of the line. I demonstrated how being ahead of the changes is always best, and that falling behind is a terrible place to be. Trying to catch the train as it sails by. I demonstrated this a bit at the piano, and then instructed each player to take more choruses of soloing on Black Nile, but this time to play 1-2 quarter notes ahead of the changes. Well I never heard Matt Mayer sound so good. He was jumping ahead and resolving in a way that he never did before. This technique is a vital part of improvisation. Especially when dealing with lots of changes at fast tempos. Playing ahead of where the music actually is in real time is a very effective, and sensible way to be in control of the music and not to get caught by the changes. It has always worked for me, and it was a thrill to hear it change Matt and the others approach on negotiating the changes on the tunes. That anticipation drill helps you lead the direction of the music. After all the music will not stop, so it is easier to be ahead of the game, and use silence or resolution to allow the music to catch you, than for you to be behind the changes, trying to run after the music while negotiating the harmony. Sort of like being ahead of the ball game in the ninth inning, rather than playing catch up ball!!!

Deep stuff really if jazz improvisation is your life as it is mine!!!


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Today I was on the panel of faculty members from the Juilliard School jazz department for a forum on the subject matter “How To Practice”. The panel was made up of department chair, and drummer Carl Allen, saxophonist Ron Blake, pianist Frank Kimbrough, bassist Ben Wolfe, drummer Kenny Washington, and myself. What an honor to do this, as well as it is a subject matter that I feel very strong about, as I have preached this to students globally for many years. I have seen so many of my students over the years return to the next lesson having not improved. Many times it is because their practice method is not good. As human beings we always want to improve fast, and be the best quickly. Unfortunately this approach does not work. Whoever  invented the expression “practice makes perfect” should be hung. It is a bad guidance quote. It should read “Perfect practice makes perfect”. There is that fine line between practicing properly, and not.  Many student come back week to week saying ” I practiced 5 hours a day”, but I do not see an improvement relative to 5 hours a day for a week. That to me means the student has wasted a lot of time.  Practicing wrong will surely waste your valuable time. That is what I spoke about. Practicing slow, and building the speed up slowly, rather than going fast and repeating constant mistakes. Focusing on one phrase, or measure at a time. How to practice scales, and other skills we work on as players, of jazz, and classical music. The other five of my esteemed colleagues had fantastic things to say, like learning the music away from the instrument in your head. Focusing on one thing at a time. making a practice journal. Using a stopwatch or kitchen timer to force yourself to practice one scale or drill at a time for a specific amount of time. Things like this. Anyway it was a really informative forum for the students who are already some of the finest young jazz students in the country, as the curve at Juilliard is extremely high. Getting into the school is probably one of the most competitive auditions nationwide. They just don’t accept anyone. I think it is even harder to get in than when I attended, and the year I got in they accepted only 2 students out of maybe 100 or more applicants. Myself, and Dan Druckman, the  current 2nd percussionist in the New York Philharmonic, and head of the percussion program in the classical percussion department at Juilliard. I really believe in this type of forum/masterclass, as with a group of faculty members such as the one mentioned here, the students get a really deep look at how these seasoned pros have dealt with the topic throughout their own quest for improvement. I sure wish they had a jazz program run by someone like Carl Allen when I went to Juilliard, although my extensive classical training has served me well in my own career, and has made me a better all around musician. I was watching these students suck up every word we said, as each faculty member got up, and spoke for 20 minutes or so, about there method for practice, and improvement. The funny thing was we all basically have similar approaches, but different wording, and slightly different concepts, but each approach was valid, and spelled the same formula for success. Those students are very fortunate to have faculty members who care enough, to take their valuable time to do this type of class. What a fantastic environment to learn in, being surrounded by this faculty of people like Rodney JonesRon Carter, Kenny Barron, Steve Turre, Eddie Henderson, Andy Farber, Billy Drummond, Bob Stewart, Antonio Ciacca, Joe Temperly, and the six mentioned above (forgive me if I forgot anyone). Next week’s forum is with legendary drummer Jimmy Cobb. I will be there!

 

Rodney Jones

Rodney Jones

I am currently on tour throughout Russia, and Southeast Asia with my quartet. On a flight today from Shenyang China to Guangzhou China I nearly cried as I listened to Rodney Jones’s CD entitled “Dreams And Stories”. This CD was recorded in the eighties featuring the late genius of Kenny Kirkland, Marc Johnson (from the Bill Evans trio), and Jeff Watts (from Wynton Marsalis Group). Of course at the time this was recorded none of these musicians had joined any of those groups yet. Their careers were just beginning to take off. Rodney had played with Dizzy Gillespie’s band at age 20 which of course gave great credibility to his career. Kenny Kirkland had his first big gig with Michael Urbaniak, and Jeff Watts of course was Wynton Marsalis’s drummer of choice from the first LP Wynton did for George Butler at CBS records. That relationship eventually led to me doing a solo LP for George Butler as well. At that time I remember Wynton coming up to me at the Juilliard school one day asking me who he could get to play piano on his record. He had just come to New York, and did not know all the young players. I recommended Kenny Kirkland to him, and that began relationship that I am sure changed Wynton’s life. I recommended Kenny because he was the best young pianist in New York, and my close friend as well. Rodney, Kenny, Cecil McBee Jr. and I had a band together that jammed regularly at the seminary next to Manhattan School Of Music, and also played local gigs in New York. I was playing drums in those days. Anyway Kenny, Rodney, and myself used to spend countless hours transcribing McCoy Tyner solos, Herbie Hancock solos, George Benson solos, as this was the passion, and these were the heroes in the music that led us to where we are today. Unfortunately Kenny is no longer with us, so when listening today to “Dreams And Stories”, which was released on High Note records after many years sitting on the shelf, I was brought to tears. I miss Kenny, and Rodney Jones continues to be one of my best friends in the world, and has helped my career take off over the years. Because of Rodney I was in the rhythm section for CD’s with Lena Horne, Tony Bennett, Ruth Brown, Gloria Lynn, as well as on the Rosie O’Donnell show as a keyboard player, and of course on 3 or 4 of Rodney’s solo CD’s. It has truly been a privilege to be close to Rodney, and be involved in his music. His deeply rooted love, and knowledge of our art form has had a tremendous influence on me through the years, and his deep spirituality has led me down the right path to enlightenment. I owe Rodney Jones a lot, and deeply value his friendship. He is truly one of the finest guitarist, composer, arranger producer, and educators on this planet. In addition his spiritual beliefs, and influence have had a profound effect on my life.  I think next to King George (George Benson), Rodney is the best. His vast array of harmonic language, and understanding of all styles has made him #1 in my mind as a producer. He can literally produce any type of music.  He knows just about every standard ever written, and can play, and or arrange them with a unique style that speaks of his life, and the music of today.  As a sideman Rodney has played with everyone from Queen Latifah to Dizzy Gillespie, and Dr. Lonnie Smith. He is certainly one of the most sought out guitarists in the world. These days Rodney is professor of guitar at the Juilliard Jazz program, where he is passing on his vast knowledge to the young up and coming guitarist in that program, which has quickly become one of the finest jazz programs in the US under the direction of the great drummer, and educator Carl Allen.  If you are a musician and you do not know who Rodney Jones is, then you are clearly living in a bubble separated from what is really happening in music. And to Rodney as a friend, and colleague for 40 years I say, “I love you, and thanks for the music. Knowing you has made me a better person, changed my life, and of course thanks for the music”!

Paul Meyers Band

Great night Friday night at Trumpets Jazz Club with the Paul Meyers Band featuring Vanderlei Pereira,  Helio Alves, and Leo Traversa. Normally Donny McCaslin plays with this band. I subbed for him. I really enjoyed Paul’s music. He is a fine writer. His tunes have emotion, spirit, and a clever use of harmony to convey his own distinctive sound. Helio Alves is a brilliant improvisor, and Leo Traversa has a gorgeous sound on this really beautiful 5 string electric bass he played. Vanderlei Pereira having been born in Rio has really a different way of playing jazz. Paul has a lot of Brazilian flavored music and of course this is right up Vanderle’s alley. He has a key instinct for the music as he makes all hits and  and section changes by instinct. It is amazing. Does not sound too difficult make all the hits and  deal with the form of the music. For most it is not. You just follow the chart and give to the music, but Vanderlei’s chart is his ears as he is blind.  I was so blown away by him. Not because he is blind, but from his playing. A great player. All great players!! And great music. In addition Trumpets has improved their musical venue by extending the stage a bit to make more room for the music. The sound and light additions have really helped. It is a much better venue to play because of these improvements.

I had a really nice time yesterday doing a master class for the drummers in the Juilliard School’s jazz program. First of all I was thrilled to get the call as I spent 5 long productive years in the building. Anyway what a beautiful set up they have now. When I went to Juilliard there was no jazz program and Wynton Marsalis, Dan Block, and Rob Waring, were the only jazz players in the school, but we studied classical music at school. Now there is a separate wing for the jazz department, and the director Carl Allen has assembled an incredible faculty and curriculum for the program. Carl a well-known and seasoned veteran drummer apparently is doing an incredible job running this program. In the 3-4 hours I spent there yesterday, I was greeted by many of my favorite musicians from the faculty. Had a little hang with Frank Kimbarro, Ron Carter, Eddie Henderson, Rodney Jones, Carl Allen, Billy Drummond, and Kenny Washington. These guys are all top of there field. At the master class I had 5 or 6 drummers and Carl Allen, Billy Drummond, and Kenny Washington attending the class. Tough company to impress. It all went well and was a really nice loose environment to teach in. Basically I was there to help the drummers open up more to the vibes and the harmonic language skills needed to play jazz. They are great young drummers already or they would not be at Juilliard, but widening the scope is a great thing for them. That is the goal of course.

I was so honored that Carl Allen, Billy Drummond, and Kenny Washington were there. ALl three are at the top of the drum world, and Kenny Washington and I have known each other 40 years. We met in high school at Music and Art High School in NYC when we were 13 or 14 years old. He was then and continues to be a true be bop master on the drums. A jazz master as are all the names listed above, but Kenny was playing with Betty Carter and Johnny Griffin when he was 17 or 18 years old, and he never attended college. The music was his college, and he is a true master. Just goes to show you if you want to learn something you can do it yourself. All the recordings are out there for you to draw from, transcribe, and simply memorize. Kenny desperately as a youngster wanted to sound like Philly Joe Jones. He memorized and mastered that style, and turned it into a huge career, and he developed his own sound. Just amazing!! Great to see Kenny. He had been teaching all day and waited a few hours just to see my master class. I was so happy. Then Kenny and I took a walk down to the 3rd floor to try and find our great friend and colleague from high school Danny Druckman, who is currently director of the percussion dept at Juilliard, as well as a percussionist with the New York Philharmonic. We did not find Danny, but I showed Kenny the infamous orchestra rehearsal room 309. I explained to him how this is where Danny Druckman and I spent countless hours rehearsing with the likes of Leonard Bernstein, Sir George Solti, Sixten Ehrling, Zubin Mehta, Herbert Von Karajan, and so many more genius conductors who came through Juilliard week to week for concerts. The room has an incredible feeling. You walk in this room and you can feel the history. I sure did!!

Afterwards a little hang at a local restaurant with Rodney Jones who has been one of my best friends for around 40 years as well. He is absolutely the most incredible  person. Highly accomplished spiritually, as well as being one of the globes finest guitarists and teachers. All in all a great day, a thrill for me, and a great honor to be called upon to do the master class at Juilliard.

Dr. Ed Joffe, Joel Weiskopf , Pete McGuiness, Roseanna Vitro, Joe Magnarelli, Tim Horner, Andy Eulau Bobby Malach, Mark Sherman, Allen Farnham. and Paul Meyers. On December 14th I took the red eye from San Jose California to New York City just in time to go home for 1 hour, and go out to New Jersey City University where I have been teaching for the last 3 years. I felt it was very important to basically go with no sleep for 24 hours, to make it to the final semester juries for all the jazz students at NJCU. Of course 5 of the students are mine, but the rest study with the professors above. Our fearless leader Ed Joffe has built a tremendous jazz department, as he has surrounded himself with an incredible faculty of professors, who all put their individual hearts into this program. I am sure anyone of these teachers would have done the same thing I did to honor their commitment to the program. Personally I love to give to these students everything I have, with my 30-35 years of professional experience, Juilliard education, and vast touring experience. I know Ed Joffe has done the same with his countless years of dedication to the program, and as a Juilliard graduate as well feels very strong about this program, as when both Ed and I attended Juilliard, there was no jazz program. Now of course they have a thriving jazz program, but NJCU is right there with all the top programs in the New York area offering great private instruction, combos, big band, and many jazz masters coming to do master classes and performances with the NJCU big band. I highly recommend this program for all aspiring jazz students. You get a great jazz education at NJCU!! Bravo Dr. Ed Joffe!!